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Murder in the Cultural Gardens
Whodunit Mystery
by Dan Hanson
set in the
Cleveland Cultural Gardens

Murder in the Cultural Gardens book - order here










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Superman Statue Press Announcement

Many people don't know that Cleveland Ohio is the home town of Superman, the world's first super hero. He was created by two Cleveland teenagers, Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, who lived in Cleveland's Glenville neighborhood and attended Glenville High School. They created the idea of Superman in 1933 but it took five years and lots of rejections before Superman appeared as the star of Action Comics No. 1 in June 1938.

Gary Kaplan

Siegel and Shuster Society President Gary Kaplan


The Siegel and Shuster Society formed in 2007 and their latest project is to create a Superman tribute area in downtown Cleveland that will feature a stainless steel statue of Superman 18' in the air, along with bronze statues of Jerry Siegel, Joe Shuster and Joanne Siegel, the original model for Lois Lane. There will also be a phone booth with Clark Kent's discarded clothes and glasses where he changed into Superman.

See photos and videos from the announcement


Senior Driver

Old driver humor



Thank You Greatest Generation - 80 year anniversary of D-Day

Eighty years ago, on the beaches of Normandy, northern France, an event unfolded that would alter the course of history. The day was June 6, 1944, a date forever etched in time as D-Day. It marked the launch of Operation Overlord, the ambitious Allied invasion that became a turning point in World War II. The audacious assault by sea, air, and land involved nearly 160,000 troops on D-Day alone.

90% of the soldiers on the first boats to hit the beach didn't live to see the end of the day. Some of them never made it to 18. Thank you to the brave heroes for their unimaginable courage. You will never be forgotten.

U.S. assault troops in an LCVP landing craft approach Omaha Beach, 6 June 1944.

U.S. assault troops in an LCVP landing craft approach Omaha Beach, 6 June 1944.


Carrying a full equipment, American assault troops move onto Utah Beach on the norther coast of France. Landing craft, in the background, jams the harbor.

Carrying a full equipment, American assault troops move onto Utah Beach on the norther coast of France. Landing craft, in the background, jams the harbor.


US Rangers scaling the wall at Pointe du Hoc

US Rangers scaling the wall at Pointe du Hoc


Thank You Greatest Generation

Thank You Greatest Generation


Memorial Day Personal Story - an immigrant from Poland

Ted Gurski WW1

Imagine being a teenager from Poland and making the journey to America - Cleveland specifically - in 1916. You settle in with your family and other Poles in what is now called Slavic Village. Your new country enters the war against Germany on April 6, 1917 and even though you are not yet 18 you are proud to enlist and become a Private in Company C of the US Army's 6th Infantry.

A little over a year later your family gets the terrible news that you "died with honor in the service of his country on the fifteenth day of October 1918".

That was my Dad's grandmother's brother Theodore Gurski. The certificate says "We hereby express our grateful appreciation of the patriotic service of Theodore Gurski who gave up his life while in the service of his country with the American forces whose achievements made possible the glorious victory in the Great War for World Freedom and to you we extend our heartfelt sympathy in your bereavement." I wonder how Granny felt when her young brother died so young for a country he had just come to for a better life.

Ted Gurski WW1 Ohio


Memorial Day is a solemn occasion to honor and remember the brave men and women, like young Ted, who sacrificed their lives while serving in the military. It's also a time for friends and families to come together and reflect on the significance of their sacrifice.

We have other tragic stories from our family's military service over the years but I just stumbled on a tube with these 3 documents and notes about Ted. Your family may have similar stories.

Amidst all the cookouts and gatherings please remember the reason for Memorial Day and the (usually) very young people who gave their lives for our freedom. They were often immigrants or first generation who made the ultimate sacrifice for their new country. Ted was a son, a brother, a nephew and like thousands of others, an immigrant. He was also a distant uncle to someone who is fortunate to be able to safely sit at a computer and post on a webiste because of his and other's sacrifices.

Ted Gurski WW1 death



The Game of Go


Steve Zilber, president of the Cleveland Go Club told us about the game of Go which dates back 3-4000 years. Originating in China, the game of Go moved to Japan and other countries.

There are white or black stones - all have the same "powers". Steve said the game scales well so they have a 9x9 board, 13x13 and 19x19 which experts like him play on.

Steve and the Cleveland Go Club were at the 2024 Cleveland Asian Festival inside Asia Plaza and playing and teaching the game of Go. Watch the short video.




Beware of Scams

Fraudsters use regular mail, telephone and email to scam individuals, businesses, payroll and tax professionals. Businesses should watch out for tax-related scams and implement safeguards. Know your risks and the warning signs to better protect your businesses and employees. Remain vigilant against common scams targeting you as a business owner, ensuring protection against fraudulent activities.

Remember, the IRS doesn't initiate contact with taxpayers by email, text messages or social media channels to request personal or financial information.

Take proactive steps today to safeguard your business and employees, by implementing robust security measures such as using anti-malware/anti-virus software with automatic updates and enforcing strong passwords with multi-factor authentication. Ensure that you only enter personal data on secure websites (https) to prevent unauthorized access.

Social media: Fraudulent form filing and bad advice

Social media can circulate inaccurate or misleading tax information that encourages people to submit false, inaccurate information in hopes of getting a refund or taking advantage of a credit. Taxpayers should always remember that if something sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

Online Account help from third-party scammers

The scammers making these offers are trying to steal a taxpayer's personal information. Taxpayers should be alert to fake communications posing as legitimate organizations in the tax and financial community. These messages arrive in the form of an unsolicited text or email to lure victims into providing valuable personal and financial information that can lead to identity theft.

Unscrupulous tax preparers

Most CPAs provide outstanding and professional service. However, people should be careful of shady tax preparers. Avoid these "ghost" preparers, who will prepare a tax return but refuse to sign or include their IRS Preparer Tax Identification Number as required by law. Avoid “Tax preparer” who is not a CPA, or tax attorney or enrolled agent!!!

Offer in compromise

Offers in Compromise is an important IRS program to help people who can't pay to settle their federal tax debts for less than the full amount owed. But "Offer in Compromise - mills" make exaggerated claims with ads about settling tax debts inexpensively. They can aggressively promote Offers in Compromise in misleading ways to people who clearly don't meet the qualifications.

Employee Retention Credit

Some unscrupulous promoters have misrepresented eligibility rules for the Employee Retention Credit, luring well-intentioned businesses to claim the credit when they don’t qualify.

Have questions? Contact CPA Sam Tanious at 440-991-6864 or e-mail samytaxservices@gmail.com


Older Americans Month - May 2024

The Ohio Department of Aging (ODA) will recognize Older Americans Month in May 2024, celebrating the 2.8 million Ohioans ages 60 and older and the many ways they contribute to, support, and benefit from their communities.

Ohio Department of Aging

This year is the 61st anniversary of Older Americans Month. The theme in 2024, established by the U.S. Administration for Community Living (ACL) is “Powered by Connection,” which showcases the profound impact that meaningful relationships and social connections have on our health and well-being.

“In Ohio, we're redefining what it means to age – pioneering innovative programs and solutions that bring people together,” said Governor Mike DeWine. “We're empowering older Ohioans to remain healthy and active contributors to their communities well past retirement age. We're investing in new spaces for older Ohioans to gather while receiving care and we're using technology to connect older adults and their caregivers with people and resources to help them thrive.”

“More older adults in Ohio are being empowered to live their best lives and age in their preferred environment – often surrounded by family and friends in the communities they love,” said ODA Director Ursel J. McElroy. “This year’s Older Americans Month theme aligns perfectly with our agency’s efforts to build even more opportunities for connection among the people we serve as part of achieving our vision of making Ohio the best place to age in the nation.”

In the past year, ODA launched its Healthy Aging Grants program, began an expansion of the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE), and invested in a revitalization of adult day services – all of which are empowering older adults to preserve their independence and remain active in their communities, while receiving the supports they need in their preferred setting.

Governor DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted issued a proclamation in recognition of the annual celebration. Older Americans Month also honors the thousands of family caregivers, frontline workers, advocates, volunteers, and others who make up Ohio’s aging network. As a further offering for Older Americans Month 2024, ODA is launching a weekly webinar series to educate State of Ohio employees on various aspects of caring for an older loved one in their lives. These webinars will take place each Friday in May, beginning at 10 a.m.

People ages 60 and older are among the fastest growing populations in Ohio and make up nearly one quarter of the state’s population. ODA strives to empower all Ohioans to live longer, healthier lives, with dignity and autonomy. To learn more about ways you and your loved ones can age well, visit Aging.Ohio.gov. To learn about Older Americans Month celebrations in your community, or to access services and supports near you, contact your area agency on aging by visiting Aging.Ohio.gov/Find-Services or by calling 1-866-246-5678.


The Sixties

Growing up in the Sixties


Alzheimer’s Association Urges Americans to Focus on Brain Health

Currently, two-thirds of Americans have at least one major risk factor for dementia. Science shows that modifying risk factors and promoting healthy behaviors can reduce the risk of cognitive decline and dementia – in fact, scientists estimate that up to 40% of dementia cases worldwide could be prevented by a change in habits. The Alzheimer’s Association is offering “10 Healthy Habits for Your Brain,” simple everyday actions people can take to reduce their dementia risk.

  1. Challenge your mind. In the words of Ted Lasso, be curious! Put the brain to work and do something new. Challenging the mind may have short- and long-term brain benefits.
  2. Stay in school. Education reduces the risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Encourage youth to stay in school and pursue the highest level of training possible. Continue your own education by taking a class at a library, school or online.
  3. Get moving. Engage in regular exercise and activities that raise your heart rate and increase blood flow to the brain and body.
  4. Protect your head. Help prevent a head injury. Wear a helmet, a seatbelt and be careful of falls.
  5. Be smoke-free. Quitting smoking can lower the risk of cognitive decline back to levels similar to those who have not smoked. It’s never too late to stop.
  6. Control your blood pressure. Medication, eating right and engaging in physical activity can lower blood pressure.
  7. Manage Diabetes. Type 2 Diabetes can be prevented or controlled by healthy eating, increased physical activity and medication.
  8. Eat right. Healthy eating can help reduce the risk of cognitive decline. Focus on vegetables and lean proteins, avoiding processed and high-fat foods.
  9. Maintain a healthy weight. Talk to your doctor about your ideal body weight. Following these healthy habits and getting adequate sleep can help you maintain a healthy weight.
  10. Sleep well. Good quality sleep is important for brain health. Turn off all screens before bed to minimize disruptions. Address any sleep-related problems like sleep apnea.

“Research confirms what we have suspected for some time – people can lower their chances of cognitive decline with healthy habits,” said Mary Ertle, program director for the Alzheimer’s Association Cleveland Area and Greater East Ohio Area chapters. “Adopting these simple actions can decrease dementia risk, even for people with a family history. It’s never too late or too early to take charge of your brain health.”

Six million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s, including 220,000 Ohioans. The number of Ohioans living with Alzheimer's is expected to increase to 250,000 by 2025. One in three seniors dies with dementia - more than breast and prostate cancer combined. Those concerned about themselves or a loved one can contact the Alzheimer's Association Cleveland Area Chapter at 216.342.5556 to schedule a care consultation and be connected to local resources.


Watch out for Utility Scammers

Be aware of scammers who call and claim to be collecting on your bill and ask for an online or over-the-phone payment. Some of these requests can sound and look real. In some cases, scammers are able to make it appear they are calling from a Dominion Energy phone number. How to avoid these scams:
  • Remember, Dominion Energy will never call you to demand a payment.
  • If you pay your bills on time, be suspicious of any call or email regarding your account.
  • Be careful using search engines. Instead go directly to dominionenergy.com. Scammers use fake ads to trick you into clicking.
  • Never provide personal or financial information to someone who calls and asks for it.
  • Verify the status of your account by logging in to your online account or the Dominion Energy app.
  • If you’re still in doubt as to the status of your account, or if you were speaking with an employee, please call Dominion Energy. There is no need to hold for an agent to check your account balance.
  • Dominion Energy employees will never request to enter a customer’s home without proper identification, an appointment or a reported emergency. Additionally, employees do not ask for payment in person.
Learn more from Dominion


Alzheimer's Association Releases 2024 Facts and Figures Report

Alzheimer's Association Releases 2024 Facts and Figures Report



10 sources of Tax-Free Income (not taxable)

  1. Workers Comp & Disability Insurance.
  2. Scholarships and Employer Education Assistance.
  3. Health Savings Account.
  4. Child Support & Alimony.
  5. Federal Disaster Relief.
  6. Inheritance and Gifts.
  7. Life Insurance Payouts.
  8. Capital Gain on your Home.
  9. Municipal Bond Interest.
  10. Roth IRA.
Some limitations and exceptions apply.

Have questions? Contact CPA Sam Tanious at 440-991-6864 or e-mail samytaxservices@gmail.com


Africa & Byzantium - Cleveland Museum of Art

The new exhibition at the Cleveland Museum of Art, Africa & Byzantium, considers the complex artistic relationships between northern and eastern African Christian kingdoms and the Byzantine Empire from the fourth century CE and beyond.

Africa and Byzantium exhibit at Cleveland Museum of Art


The first international loan exhibition to treat this subject, the show includes more than 160 works of secular and sacred art from across geographies and faiths, including large-scale frescoes, mosaics, and luxury goods such as metalwork, jewelry, panel paintings, architectural elements, textiles, and illuminated manuscripts.

Diptych with Twelve Apostles and Saint Paul, c. 1700 - Ethiopia

Diptych with Twelve Apostles
and Saint Paul, c. 1700 - Ethiopia


See photos and video and more from Africa and Byzantium


Fun with Maps - Byzantium

The Byzantine Empire (Byzantium), also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire, was the continuation of the Roman Empire centered in Constantinople during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages. Three centuries after the pharaohs of ancient Egypt ended their rule, new African rulers built empires in the northern and eastern regions of that continent. Spanning from the Empire of Aksum in present-day Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Yemen to the Christian kingdoms of Nubia in present-day Sudan, these complex civilizations cultivated economic, political, and cultural relationships with one another.

During most of its existence, the empire remained the most powerful economic, cultural, and military force in the Mediterranean world.

This episode shows a lot of maps of Byzantium at different dates to show how it grew and then was reduced to nothing. We also show some maps and items from the Cleveland Museum of Art's newest exhibition called Africa & Byzantium. It consists of nearly 160 works of secular and sacred art from across geographies and faiths.

See more Fun with Maps episodes


Favorite Italian Wedding Soup from Casa Dolce Bakery

Both Cleveland101.com and ClevelandCooks.com rely on visitors to suggest their favorite in Cleveland and NE Ohio. Then the staff makes several visits and also samples competing places before making the favorite decision. After lots of tasty sampling we found that we agree with our visitors and declared that Casa Dolce at 5732 Mayfield Rd. in Mayfield Hts. Ohio has our favorite Italian Wedding Soup.

Margie Axelrod, owner of Casa Dolce, stresses the freshness of not only their very popular soups but all their other items including Cassata Cake, homemade Italian cookies and pastries and sandwiches, paninis, salads and more. Our tasters remarked that the Italian Wedding Soup has a flavor reminiscent of their mothers and grandmothers recipes. Watch Margie explain in the video below.

See more Cleveland Favorites, and recommend your own.


75th anniversary of Paramount Pictures - January 1987

Who do you recognize?

75th anniversary of Paramount Pictures - Jan 1987 photo


75th anniversary of Paramount Pictures - Jan 1987 photo


75th anniversary of Paramount Pictures - Jan 1987 photo



Just Thinking

Today I was in a shoe store that sells only shoes, nothing else. A young girl with a tattoo and green hair walked over to me and asked, "What brings you in today? I looked at her and said, "I'm interested in buying a refrigerator." She didn't quite know how to respond, had that deer in the headlights look.

I was thinking about old age and decided that old age is when you still have something on the ball, but you are just too tired to bounce it.

When people see a cat's litter box they always say, "Oh, have you got a cat?" I just say, "No, it's for company!"

Employment application blanks always ask who is to be called in case of an emergency. I think you should write, "An ambulance."

The older you get the tougher it is to lose weight because by then your body and your fat have gotten to be really good friends.

The easiest way to find something lost around the house is to buy a replacement.

Have you ever noticed: The Roman Numerals for forty (40) are XL.

The sole purpose of a child's middle name is so he knows when he's really in trouble.

Did you ever notice that when you put the 2 words "The" and "IRS" together it spells "Theirs?"

Aging: Eventually you will reach a point when you stop lying about your age and start bragging about it.

Some people try to turn back their "odometers." Not me. I want people to know why I look this way. I've traveled a long way and a lot of the roads were not paved.

Ah! Being young is beautiful but being old is comfortable.

Lord, keep your arm around my shoulder and your hand over my mouth.

May you always have:

Love to share,
Cash to spare,
Tires with air,
And friends who care.


A Different Perspective

Rest of Life



We are a Unique Generation

  • We grew up in the 40s-50s-60.
  • We studied in the 50s-60s-70s.
  • We dated in the 50s-60s-70s.
  • We got married and discovered the world in the 60s-70s-80s.
  • We ventured into the 70s-80s.
  • We stabilized in the 90s.
  • We got wiser in the 2000s.
  • And went firmly through the 2010s.
  • Turns out we've lived through NINE different decades, TWO different centuries, & TWO different millennia.
  • We have gone from the telephone with an operator for long-distance calls to video calls to anywhere in the world.
  • We have gone from slides to YouTube, from vinyl records to online music, from handwritten letters to email and WhatsApp.
  • We have gone from live matches on the radio, to black and white TV, and then to HDTV.
  • We went to Blockbuster and now we watch Netflix.
  • We got to know the first computers, punch cards, diskettes and now we have gigabytes and megabytes in hand on our cell phones or iPads.
  • We wore shorts throughout our childhood and then long pants, oxfords, Bermuda shorts, etc.
  • We dodged infantile paralysis, meningitis, H1N1 flu and now COVID-19.
  • We rode skates, tricycles, invented cars, bicycles, mopeds, gasoline or diesel cars and now we ride hybrids or 100% electric.
Yes, we've been through a lot but what a great life we've had! They could describe us as "exennials" people who were born in that world of the fifties, who had an analog childhood and a digital adulthood.

We're kind of Ya-seen-it-all. Our generation has literally lived through and witnessed more than any other in every dimension of life. It is our generation that has literally adapted to "CHANGE".

A big round of applause to all the members of a very special generation, which are UNIQUE.


Italian Sculptors of Guardians Ohio Historical Marker Ceremony

Since the Cleveland Indians changed their name to the Cleveland Guardians the stone monuments called the Guardians of Traffic on the Lorain Carnegie - Hope Memorial Bridge in Cleveland have deservedly received more attention. Now the Italian immigrants who cut and sculpted the stone for those impressive monuments are getting much-deserved attention. An Ohio Historical Marker was dedicated on May 5, 2023 on Random Road on the street in Little Italy at the former site of Ohio Stone Cut Company which created the statues.

Tom Chema, Mary Martin, Blaine Griffin, Pamela Dorazio-Dean, Joe Marinucci, Father Joseph Previte and Anthony Pinto

Tom Chema, Mary Martin, Blaine Griffin, Pamela Dorazio-Dean,
Joe Marinucci, Father Joseph Previte and Anthony Pinto at the unveiling

Ohio Historical Marker Italian Stone Cutters

The only bilingual Ohio Historical marker


Photos and videos of the Italian Stone Cutters marker ceremony


Remember our car radios?

Old Car Radio



Funny Retiree Mental Fitness Evaluation

This test is to ascertain your mental state now. If you get one right you are doing OK, if you get none right you better go for counseling. (I'll meet you there.)

There are 4 test questions. Don't miss one.

Giraffe Test

1. How do you put a giraffe into a refrigerator?


Stop and think about it and decide on your answer before you scroll down.

Giraffe

The Correct Answer: Open the refrigerator, put in the giraffe, and close the door. This question tests whether you tend to do simple things in an overly complicated way.

Elephant Test

2. How do you put an elephant into a refrigerator?

Did you say, Open the refrigerator, put in the elephant, and close the refrigerator?
Wrong Answer.

Correct Answer:

Open the refrigerator, take out the giraffe, put in the elephant and close the door. This tests your ability to think through the repercussions of your previous actions.

Lion King Test

3. The Lion King is hosting an Animal Conference. All the animals attend... except one. Which animal does not attend?

Correct Answer:

The Elephant. The elephant is in the refrigerator. You just put him in there. This tests your memory.

Okay, even if you did not answer the first three questions correctly, you still have one more chance to show your true abilities.

Crocodile Test

4. There is a river you must cross but it is used by crocodiles, and you do not have a boat. How do you manage it?

Correct Answer:

You jump into the river and swim across. Haven't you been listening? All the crocodiles are attending the Animal Conference. This tests whether you learn quickly from your mistakes. Ha Ha!


Clevelander Sara Lucy Bagby
The last person returned to slavery in the US

The Underground Railroad was a network of secret routes and safe houses established in the US during the early 1800s to help slaves escape into free states and Canada. It was run by abolitionists and others sympathetic to the cause of the escapees. Ohio had many stops on the Underground Railroad and since Canada was an ultimate destination, the short distance across Lake Erie from Cleveland to Canada made the city a popular destination. Cleveland was codenamed Hope on the Underground Railroad.

Restore Cleveland Hope operates the Underground Railroad Interpretive Center in the Cozad-Bates House, the only surviving pre-Civil War building in University Circle. They offer tours and events and it was here that we learned of the story of Sara Lucy Bagby.

Sara Lucy Bagby display at Cozad-Bates House

Sara Lucy Bagby display at Cozad-Bates House


Sara Lucy Bagby was born in the early 1840s in Virginia. On October 3, 1860 Bagby fled from slavery in Wheeling. She eventually escaped slavery via the Underground Railroad and made her way to Cleveland, Ohio.

Her arrest in Cleveland on January 19, 1861 became a test case of the Fugitive Slave Act.

Wheeling resident John Goshorn and his son showed proof of ownership, and the federal court ordered her return to Virginia. Sara Lucy Bagby was the last person in the United States forced to return to slavery in the South under the Fugitive Slave Act.

The Cleveland Plain Dealer and Democrat Party of the US were both pro-slavery so despite the state government's and citizens of Cleveland's attempts to intervene, Lucy was transported back to Goshorn's property in Wheeling, then still part of Virginia.

Cleveland Plain Dealer slavery sign


After the Emancipation Proclamation, Bagby eventually resettled in Cleveland, where she died in 1906 and was buried.

In this video, Kathryn Puckett, Restore Cleveland Hope Board Chair, tells the story of Sara Lucy Bagby.



See more from the Cozad-Bates House in Cleveland


I Wish You Enough

Recently I overheard a father and daughter in their last moments together at the airport. They had announced the departure. Standing near the security gate, they hugged and the Father said, "I love you, and I wish you enough." The daughter replied, "Dad, our life together has been more than enough. Your love is all I ever needed. I wish you enough, too, Dad."

They kissed and the daughter left. The Father walked over to the window where I was seated. Standing there I could see he wanted and needed to cry. I tried not to intrude on his privacy, but he welcomed me in by asking, "Did you ever say good-bye to someone knowing it would be forever?"

"Yes, I have," I replied. "Forgive me for asking, but why is this a forever-good-bye?"

"I am old, and she lives so far away. I have challenges ahead and the reality is, the next trip back will be for my funeral," he said.

"When you were saying good-bye, I heard you say, 'I wish you enough,' may I ask what that means?"

He began to smile, "That's a wish that has been handed down from other generations. My parents used to say it to everyone..." He paused a moment and looked up as if trying to remember it in detail, and he smiled even more. "When we said, 'I wish you enough,' we were wanting the other person to have a life filled with just enough good things to sustain them.'' Then turning toward me, he shared the following as if he were reciting it from memory.

I wish you enough sun to keep your attitude bright no matter how gray the day may appear.

I wish you enough rain to appreciate the sun even more.

I wish you enough happiness to keep your spirit alive and everlasting.

I wish you enough pain so that even the smallest of joys in life may appear bigger.

I wish you enough gain to satisfy your wanting.

I wish you enough loss to appreciate all that you possess.

I wish you enough hellos to get you through the final good-bye.

He then began to cry and walked away.

They say it takes a minute to find a special person, an hour to appreciate them, a day to love them; but then an entire life to forget them.


Don't hang out with Negative People

A man was getting a haircut prior to a trip to Rome. He mentioned the trip to the barber, who responded, “Why would anyone want to go there. It’s crowded and dirty and full of Italians. You’re crazy to go to Rome. So, how are you getting there?”

“We’re taking United,” was the reply. “We got a great rate!” “United!” exclaimed the barber. “That’s a terrible airline. Their planes are old, their flight attendants are ugly and they’re always late. So, where are you staying in Rome?”

“We’ll be at the downtown International Marriott.” “That dump! That’s the worst hotel in Rome. The rooms are small, the service is surly and they’re overpriced. So, whatcha doing when you get there?”

We’re going to go to see the Vatican and we hope to see the Pope. “That’s rich,” laughed the barber. “You and a million other people trying to see him. He’ll look the size of an ant. Boy, good luck on this lousy trip of yours. You’re going to need it!”

A month later, the man again came in for his regular haircut. The barber asked him about his trip to Rome. “It was wonderful,” explained the man. “Not only were we on time in one of United’s brand new planes, but it was overbooked and they bumped us up to first class. The food and wine were wonderful, and I had a beautiful young stewardess who waited on me hand and foot.

And the hotel! Well, it was great! They’d just finished a $25 million remodeling job and now it’s the finest hotel in the city. They were overbooked too, so they apologized and gave us the presidential suite at no extra charge!”

“Well,”muttered the barber. “I know you didn’t get to see the Pope” “Actually, we were quite lucky, for as we toured the Vatican, a Swiss Guard tapped me on the shoulder and explained that the Pope likes to meet some of the visitors, and if I’d be so kind as to step into his private room and wait, the Pope would personally greet me. Sure enough, five minutes later, the Pope walked in. As I knelt down he spoke to me.”

“What did he say?”

“He said, ‘Where’d you get the crappy haircut?


You didn't know I was a chef, did you?

Banana Bread



Can you still feel the burn from this?

Mercurochrome bottle



Battlefield Crosses

Battlefield Crosses



If they only knew

1939 NY Times about TV



Signs of a Stroke - Remember STR

Remember the '3' steps, STR. Sometimes symptoms of a stroke are difficult to identify. Unfortunately, the lack of awareness spells disaster. The stroke victim may suffer severe brain damage when people nearby fail to recognize the symptoms of a stroke. Now doctors say a bystander can recognize a stroke by asking three simple questions:

S Ask the individual to SMILE.

T Ask the person to TALK and SPEAK A SIMPLE SENTENCE (Coherently) (i.e. It is sunny out today.)

R Ask him or her to RAISE BOTH ARMS.

If he or she has trouble with ANY ONE of these tasks, call emergency number immediately and describe the symptoms to the dispatcher.

New Sign of a Stroke - Stick out Your Tongue. Another 'sign' of a stroke is this: Ask the person to 'stick' out his tongue... If the tongue is 'crooked', if it goes to one side or the other,that is also an indication of a stroke.

More on Recognizing a Stroke


Lost Words From Those Of Us Lucky Enough To Have Lived Through the 1950's

Mergatroyd! Do you remember that word? Would you believe the spell-checker did not recognize the word Mergatroyd? Heavens to Mergatroyd!

The other day a not so elderly, (I say 75), lady said something to her son about driving a Jalopy; and he looked at her, quizzically and said, "What the heck is a Jalopy?" He had never heard of the word jalopy! She knew she was old ... But not that old!

Well, I hope you are Hunky Dory after you read this and chuckle.

About a month ago, I illuminated some old expressions that have become obsolete because of the inexorable march of technology. These phrases included: Don't touch that dial, Carbon copy, You sound like a broken record, and Hung out to dry.

Back in the olden days, we had a lot of moxie. We'd put on our best bib and tucker, to straighten up and fly right.

Heavens to Betsy! Gee whillikers! Jumping jehoshaphat, Holy moley!

We were in like Flynn and living the life of Riley ; and even a regular guy couldn't accuse us of being a knucklehead, a nincompoop or a pill. Not for all the tea in China!

Back in the olden days, life used to be swell, but when's the last time anything was swell? Swell has gone the way of beehives, pageboys and the D.A.; of spats, knickers, fedoras, poodle skirts, saddle shoes, and pedal pushers. Oh, my aching back! Kilroy was here, but he isn't anymore.

We wake up from what surely has been just a short nap, and before we can say, "Well, I'll be a monkey's uncle!" Or, "This is a fine kettle of fish!" We discover that the words we grew up with, the words that seemed omnipresent - as oxygen - have vanished with scarcely a notice from our tongues and our pens and our keyboards.Poof, go the words of our youth, the words we've left behind. We blink, and they're gone. Where have all those great phrases gone?

Long gone: Pshaw, The milkman did it. Hey! It's your nickel. Don't forget to pull the chain. Knee high to a grasshopper. Well, Fiddlesticks! Going like sixty. I'll see you in the funny papers. Don't take any wooden nickels. Wake up and smell the roses.

It turns out there are more of these lost words and expressions than Carter has liver pills. This can be disturbing stuff! (Carter's Little Liver Pills are gone too!)

Leaves us to wonder where Superman will find a phone booth...

See ya later, alligator! Okeydokey.


Stay Fit To Drive

The Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) supports the state highway system and promotes transportation initiatives statewide. ODOT's mission is to provide safe and easy movement of people and goods from place to place.

As we age we have all experienced slowing down and/or weakening of some of our abilities. Maybe it's our vision or hearing not being what it used to be. Or a physical or mental challenge. Or even our medications! Maybe we didn't drive much during the Covid pandemic and are a little rusty or fearful now.

The good news is that we older adults are among the safest drivers on Ohio roads. We are more likely to wear our seatbelts and less likely to speed or drink and drive as some of the younger people. The bad news is that the risk of being injured or killed in a crash increases with age.

The best news is that ODOT is sharing information about resources and services available to older Ohioans, families and friends, caregivers and others who interact with older drivers through its Stay Fit to Drive program.

Stay Fit to Drive - older woman driving


More information and a free informative, colorful brochure


So many jobs, so few people - Why not Workers over age 55?

Coming in to 2022 the residual effects of Covid-19 are still with us. Among many economic issues plaguing the country, persistent supply chain problems persist and hordes of people are finding ways of not returning to work so employers can't find job applicants, much less qualified job applicants.

Older worker shows younger worker

If the unemployment numbers and the economy return to its pre-Covid19 status it will mean the continuation of having more jobs out there than there are people to fill them. In a normal job market, job seekers over the age of 55 aren't normally welcomed with open arms, outside of menial part-time work. And unfortunately, in some cases HR people regard job applicants in their late 40's as too old. It's more of a personal attitude of those in the hiring process and not necessarily a matter of company policy - not on the record anyway.

Read the rest of the article about hiring senior employees


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Better than many weather forecasters

Stone to forecast weather



ClevelandSeniors.Com Joke of the Week

After seeing a documentary about ice fishing, Zeke decided to give it a try. He gathered some gear and headed out to the ice. As he set up and was about to drill his first hole he heard a booming voice from above saying "There are no fish under the ice."

Zeke was starled but started to drill. He again heard the powerful voice stating "There are no fish under the ice."

Zeke got scared. But decided he must be imagining it and began to drill again.

The voice boomed out again, "There are no fish under the ice."

Zeke looked up to the havnes and asked, "Is that you Lord?"

The voice boomed, "No, this is the manager of the skating rink"


McDonalds menu in 1972

McDonalds menu in 1972



Advice from someone heading toward his 80th birthday

  1. After loving my parents, my siblings, my spouse, my children and my friends, I have now started loving myself.
  2. I have realized that I am not "Atlas". The world does not rest on my shoulders.
  3. I have stopped bargaining with vegetable & fruit vendors. A few pennies more is not going to break me, but it might help the poor fellow save for his daughter's school fees.
  4. I leave my waitress a big tip. The extra money might bring a smile to her face. She is toiling much harder for a living than I am.
  5. I stopped telling the elderly that they've already told that story many times. The story makes them walk down memory lane & relive their past.
  6. I have learned not to correct people even when I know they are wrong. The onus of making everyone perfect is not on me. Peace is more precious than perfection.
  7. I give compliments freely & generously. Compliments are a mood enhancer not only for the recipient, but also for me. And a small tip for the recipient of a compliment, never, NEVER turn it down, just say "Thank You."
  8. I have learned not to bother about a crease or a spot on my shirt. Personality speaks louder than appearances.
  9. I walk away from people who don't value me. They might not know my worth, but I do.
  10. I remain cool when someone plays dirty to outrun me in the rat race. I am not a rat & neither am I in any race.
  11. I am learning not to be embarrassed by my emotions. It's my emotions that make me human.
  12. I have learned that it's better to drop the ego than to break a relationship. My ego will keep me aloof, whereas with relationships, I will never be alone.
  13. I have learned to live each day as if it's the last. After all, it might be the last.
  14. I am doing what makes me happy. I am responsible for my happiness, and I owe it to myself. Happiness is a choice. You can be happy at any time, just choose to be!



Beatitudes for Friends of the Aged

Blessed are they who understand
My faltering step and palsied hand.

Blessed are they who know that my ears today
Must strain to catch the things they say.

Blessed are they who seem to know
That my eyes are dim and my wits are slow.

Blessed are they who looked away
When coffee spilled at the table today.

Blessed are they with a cheery smile
Who stop to chat for a little while.

Blessed are they who never say,
"You've told that story twice today."

Blessed are they who know the ways
To bring back memories of yesterdays.

Blessed are they who make it known
That I'm loved, respected and not alone.

Blessed are they who know I'm at a loss
To find the strength to carry the Cross.

Blessed are they who ease the days
On my journey Home in loving ways.

Senior citizens hands




An Answered Prayer

Smith climbed to the top of Mt. Sinai to get close enough to talk to God. Looking up, he asked the Lord.. "God, what does a million years mean to you?"

The Lord replied, "A minute."

Smith asked, "And what does a million dollars mean to you?"

The Lord replied, "A penny."

Smith asked, "Can I have a penny?"

The Lord replied, "In a minute."


The 7 Dwarves of Old Age

7 Dwarves of Old Age



Murder in the Cultural Gardens

"It just didn’t seem right to DJ. A body found bludgeoned in a place known for “Peace through Mutual Understanding.” But there she was, crumpled behind a bust of composer Franz Liszt in the Hungarian Cultural Garden. He pulled out his cell phone and dialed 911. “What is the nature of your emergency?” the dispatcher queried. With a suddenly very dry mouth DJ managed to get out, “There’s been a murder in the Cultural Gardens.”

That's the beginning of the recently published first novel by Dan Hanson.

Murder in the Cultural Gardens book cover - Franz Liszt statue


The whodunit, titled Murder in the Cultural Gardens, takes place in the Cleveland Cultural Gardens and all 30+ gardens are featured during the mystery. You may even recognize some of the characters.



Click the link above to learn more or to purchase in paperback or Kindle version from Amazon. Or contact Dan via the Murder in the Cultural Gardens webpage to have a signed book delivered.


A Senior Prayer

God, grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway, The good fortune to run into the ones that I do, and the eyesight to tell the difference.

Do you need help paying your Medicare expenses?

If you are a low-income Medicare beneficiary, the Medicare Premium Assistance Programs (MPAP) may help you pay some or all of your Medicare cost-sharing expenses (premiums, copays, and coinsurance). MPAP is part of the Ohio Medicaid program. MPAP is sometimes called the “Medicare buy-in” or “Medicare savings” program.

Learn more about help paying your Medicare expenses


Who Needs Advance Directives about Medical Care?

Advance directives help ensure that you receive the medical care you would want even when doctors and family members are making decisions on your behalf. There are two different types of advance directives: Health Care Power of Attorney and Living Will.

Learn more about Health Care Power of Attorney and Living Wills


Elder Abuse: What Is It and How to Get Help

It is difficult for people to accept the notion that adult abuse occurs in the elderly, but the sad fact is that it occurs everyday. Last year in Ohio over 16,000 incidents of elder abuse were reported to Ohio Department of Job and Family Services. In Cuyahoga County alone, over 3,000 incidences of elder abuse were reported to Cuyahoga County Department and Senior Adult Services, Adult Protective Services.

More about Elder Abuse


Should you purchase prepaid funeral arrangements?

Many people do not like to think about death or funeral arrangements, but some people do make plans for when they pass. For example, some people choose to purchase “pre-paid funeral contracts.” These contacts allow you to make decisions about your own funeral, and pay for it ahead of time. These pre-paid contracts give some people peace of mind. But before purchasing such a contract, keep the following issues in mind.

More about prepaid funeral arrangements


How can seniors learn more about benefits available to them?

BenefitsCheckUp is a web-based service that helps seniors. It is especially helpful for those with limited income and resources, their family members and, social service organizations. It connects people to over 2,000 public and private programs. Many adults over 55 need help paying for basic needs. Some of the benefits screened for are health care services, prescription drugs, rent assistance, in-home services, meals, heat, and energy assistance, and transportation.

Learn more about Benefits Checkup


Grandparent POAs and Caretaker Authorization

Grandparents sometimes find themselves caring for a grandchild unexpectedly. This often happens without any formal court order giving the grandparent custody or guardianship. Without custody or guardianship, the grandparent will face problems getting medical care for the child or dealing with the child’s school.

More about Grandparent POAs and Caretaker Authorization


How do I name a Durable Power of Attorney?

A durable power of attorney can be one of the most helpful estate planning tools a person uses, but it can also be very risky. A durable POA gives a person (who is called an “attorney in fact”) legal authority to act for another person in a variety of matters, including banking, benefits, housing, taxes, real estate, litigation, and more. (The durable POA is different from a Health Care Power of Attorney, which is the form used to appoint a person to make decisions about health care.)

Learn more about Durable Power of Attorney


Are Wills Really That Important?

:When my mother died in 2012, we discovered that her will was from 1959 and had not been updated to reflect the many changes in her life since then: she had four more children, she bought a house, furniture, an automobile, jewelry, and a dog. As a result, my mother died without a valid will. Following her death, bills had to be paid, property sold, her furniture, jewelry, the car divided, and someone had to take in the dog."

Read more about the importance of Wills


Recommended For You (popular with other Cleveland Seniors)




ClevelandSeniors.Com Book of the Week
Before You Leap



Before You Leap starts on screeching tires, literally—an interstate bridge, a police chase, three men trapped in a car, driving at full speed. The two in the front are arguing, one is brandishing a gun, and the third is bleeding profusely in the backseat. You can’t help but be immediately hooked and wonder, Who are they? And how on earth did they get here?

The novel then takes you back a few days. Greg Cole’s quiet and secluded life is about to be thrown into chaos when he learns that his dead sister’s convicted murderer has been released early.

Before You Leap is absorbing, thought-provoking, and psychologically riveting. I was struck by how the author is able to delve into Greg’s psyche and express his grief over the loss of his sister—and the inner turmoil that overtakes him—with such clarity. What you’re left with is a poignant, complex, nail-biting novel where you watch in a stupor as someone’s life and sanity shatter. And as it crescendos, the story pulls the rug from under your feet and delivers the most unexpected twist—one that took my breath away and left me reeling.

Before You Leap


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